Albina Head Start

Albina Head Start embarked on an ambitious plan to bring solar power to their schools and more renewable energy education to their classrooms. The installed system serves a vital role in promoting solar energy and enhancing the STEM curriculum for our students and the communities we serve.

Pacific Power’s Blue Sky customers helped fund a 49.7 kilowatt solar project at the Owen Blank campus and was the key to making these goals a reality.

The system is now installed and they are on our way to offsetting almost 70% of their electricity use at the campus with renewable energy.

Children, families, our partners, other facility users, and the greater community will benefit from solar powered Albina Head Start because money saved on operating costs will enable more and improved services. Education and outreach for environmentally sustainable solutions targeting low- income families/communities will be taught at monthly Albina Head Start Parent Meetings and community events. This includes the cost benefits and sustainable approaches to weatherization and/or solarization to cut heating bills and coal emissions from burning natural gas taught by Multnomah County Public Health, to Head Start families.

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On March 21, 2016 Albina Head Start embarked on an ambitious plan to bring solar power to our schools and more renewable energy education to our classrooms. The installed system will serve a vital role in promoting solar energy and enhancing the STEM curriculum for our students and the communities we serve.

 

Pacific Power’s Blue Sky grant for a 49.7 kilowatt solar project at our Owen Blank campus was the key to making these goals a reality. The system is now installed and we are on our way to offsetting almost 70% of our electricity use at the campus with renewable energy.

 

One of our main objectives was to position Albina Head Start as a steward of sustainability and a cornerstone of green initiatives that benefit our communities. With solar systems, students are able to see first-hand how sunlight is converted to electricity and solar installations can be integrated into a school’s math, science, and technologies program complementing Albina’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) focus in our classrooms. In our current curriculum we are using the Common Core Portland Public Schools curriculum of STEM and solar technology at Albina sites shows how advancements in STEM can change and sustain a future for all people who are educated through STEM to better the world and futures.

 

We plan to use the money saved from our reduced electricity bills to enhance the educational opportunities for the children and families we serve. The solar project will enable us to fund and use the tools and resources as advised through the Solar 4R Schools program. Adopting these best practices will help strengthen our existing STEM curriculum and will provide the types of engaging content and materials we need to stir interest in the critical period of early education.

 

The environmental benefit of switching to solar energy is one of the biggest changes we can make in our communities to curb global warming. With rising concerns about our carbon footprint and the mounting cost of energy, solar is a wise investment for the health of the environment and to generations we serve, and for generations to come.

 

Children, families, our partners, other facility users, and the greater community will benefit from solar powered Albina Head Start because money saved on operating costs will enable more and improved services. Education and outreach for environmentally sustainable solutions targeting low- income families/communities will be taught at monthly Albina Head Start Parent Meetings and community events. This includes the cost benefits and sustainable approaches to weatherization and/or solarization to cut heating bills and coal emissions from burning natural gas taught by Multnomah County Public Health, to Head Start families.

 

Some of the families we cater to, live in green or LEED (Leaders in Energy and Environmental Design) low -income housing buildings such as Shaver Green. This will bring awareness to possibly having more buildings catering to affordable housing, where builders may implement the LEED model for lessening economic constraints on families from electric and gas bills; while promoting environmental sustainability. This will also address gentrification and the housing crisis in N/NE Portland to where all people are worthy of accessing sustainable energy.

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